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Barrier-free trade: disadvantages and ways to mitigate

Barrier-free trade: disadvantages and ways to mitigate

6/19/2020

On June 18, the Council of the Eurasian Economic Commission and the EEC Board considered issues of internal trade in the Eurasian Economic Union and outlined a set of constructive decisions. It has been noted that new tools and prompt actions are required.


A comprehensive approach to removing obstacles in the Union’s internal market has been reflected in the Strategic Directions for Developing the Eurasian Economic Integration until 2025, the draft of which was approved in general by the Heads of the EAEU States on May 19, 2020. Nowadays, particular provisions of the document are being clarified and an Implementation Plan is being prepared. 


Along with that, Mikhail Myasnikovich, Chairman of the EEC Board, has proposed to take prompt measures aimed at accelerated elaboration of mechanisms for coordinated customs control of imported goods, e-document exchange, identifying sanctioned goods, integrating electronic traceability systems for goods, especially those regulated by veterinary and sanitary control, creating "green corridors", electronic queues and other measures promoting mutual trade. 


Alexei Overchuk, Deputy Chairman of the Government of the Russian Federation and Member of the EEC Council, has presented fundamental proposals for resolving differences and settling disputes related to the movement of goods across the Union Member States’ borders. Igor Petrishenko, Deputy Prime Minister of the Republic of Belarus and Chairman of the EEC Council, has defined vital practical tasks to be immediately considered and ways to mitigate. Alikhan Smailov, First Deputy Prime Minister of the Republic of Kazakhstan and Member of the EEC Council, Mher Grigoryan, Vice Prime Minister of the Republic of Armenia and Member of the EEC Council, and Erkin Asrandiev, Vice Prime Minister of the Kyrgyz Republic and Member of the EEC Council, have presented specific recommendations.


With regard to discussion of these issues by the EEC Board on June 9, there are reasons to expect a higher level of trust in mutual trade. This will enable improving information exchange in tax and customs spheres, coordinating measures and common approaches to managing import of third-country goods along the entire contour of the Union’s external border, ensuring accelerated application of traceability mechanisms when importing goods and reducing illegal movement of goods across the external border and within the Union.


The EEC Council has decided to form a High-Level Working Group as well as elaborate a relevant road map.


The EEC Board believes that these measures, jointly with the decisions already adopted in 2020 to remove barriers and settle mutual claims, will enable eliminating problematic situations in internal trade that provoke strong criticism from the business community and public authorities of the Union countries.